Books, Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays: Cast in Honor

Teaser Tuesdays

It’s time for another “Teaser Tuesday!”

This feature (or meme)  is one I originally discovered on my friend Kim’s site Book Munchies, and is hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm. For those of you who would like to play along at home (or more specifically on your homepage), here is how Teaser Tuesdays work.

– Grab (one of) your current read(s) and open it to a random page
– Share a couple “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
– BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)

—> Now on to the main event!

There were too many good lines in this book, so I included a few of my favs!

Cast in Honor (Chronicles of Elantra, #11) by Michelle Sagara

Paperback, 512 pages
Publisher: Mira
Release Date: November 24, 2015
ISBN# 9780778318590
Page(s): …

“I just told you–” Kaylin caught up. “You’re telling me me they’re significant in the Aerie.”

“I’m trying to tell you that, yes.” To Teela, he said, “Did you have these issues when you introduced Kaylin to the High Halls?”

“Not these specific ones, no. The Barrani Halls are slightly simpler. Everyone you meet is going to try to kill you at one point or another; she only had to try to avoid the ones who were going to do so immediately.” (95)

Mandoran entered the dining room, as well. “No,” he told everyone, “I am not staying behind.” He looked at Kaylin as he spoke.

She held up both hands. “Don’t look at me like that — I wasn’t even going to suggest it.”

“Teela did.”

“Then glare at Teela. I don’t even like the fiefs.” (143)

 “Did she mention our latest investigation?”

“Yes. She also extended an invitation to dinner. Do not stand in the library gawking. If you have something to say, say it while we walk.”    …

Kaylin’s biggest question, as she followed the Arkon’s impatient lead, was Yes, but are you going to accept? (175)

“Are they always like this?” Kattea whispered.

“Yes. And they can hear you two rooms away, even if you whisper.”

“Oh. I don’t like him.”

“Mandoran?”

“Is that his name?”

“It’s the polite version.”

“What’s the rude version?” (257)

Hah! I LOVE this series. This book has many more great lines/scenes but I’ll stop with these.

Books, Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays: I Work at a Public Library

Teaser Tuesdays

It’s time for another “Teaser Tuesday!”

This feature (or meme)  is one I originally discovered on my friend Kim’s site Book Munchies, and is hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm. For those of you who would like to play along at home (or more specifically on your homepage), here is how Teaser Tuesdays work.

– Grab (one of) your current read(s) and open it to a random page
– Share a couple “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
– BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)

—> Now on to the main event!

Okay, so I work at a public library and can attest that these stories (while they may seem too impossible to be true) are extremely accurate to how life really is for someone who works on the front lines in a library. Enjoy!

I Work at a Public Library: A Collection of Stories from the Stacks by Gina Sheridan

Paperback, 157 pages
Publisher: Adams Media Corporation
Release Date: July 4th, 2014
ISBN#9781440576249
Page: 13

 Rude, How

A woman approached the interior book return slot.

Woman: [peering in] Hello?

Me: Hi!

Woman: I was talking to the person at the other book drop but he was ignoring me, how rude!

Me: I’m so sorry, there is no one manning the outside book drop. Is there anything I can help you with?

Woman: Oh dear. Well I was just asking him the difference between DVDs and CDs and could they all go in the same slot. Anyway, are DVDs those iPaddy things?

Me: Well, DVDs are movies. CDs are music or books to listen to. iPads are different.

Woman: How confusing! No wonder the fellow at the other book drop ignored me!

Books, Librarianship, Literary Criticism, Writing

When Book Reviews Go Wrong

When Book Reviews Go Wrong – ABC News.

“Such a widespread mistake is unusual, but it does make one wonder: How much trust should one place in the critic?”

So asks Joanna Prisco, the reporter who penned this article for ABC News. And to be quite honest, it’s a great question. How much should we listen to someone else’s opinion of the literature we are choosing to read. Isn’t personal interest enough to judge whether or not to pick a book up? Why else would the publishers put a blurb on the back or inside pockets of the book’s jacket?

To Read or Not to Read? It’s always a pertinent question.

Let’s be honest, there are so many things that could draw us to a book. The old adage that we shouldn’t judge a book by it’s cover is a crock. At least to some extent. We’re supposed to judge the books by their covers, initially, and cover artists often work really hard to imbue a cover with some insight into the story or the information being given. It’s meant to draw you in and entice you to take a closer look. Once your there, the jacket copy is supposed to make you feel something; curious, intrigued, maybe even angry. Sometimes this works, sometimes it doesn’t. If you’re an avid reader like me, this is often enough for you to formulate an opinion. You either want to read it, or you don’t. Nine times out of ten, I don’t want or need anyone else’s opinion to make me interested in reading a book. I could care less if the critics who read it hated it, or were indifferent to it, because if I like it, that’s all that matters to me. I don’t want someone trying to change my opinion before I even give it a try.

But for other people, that might not be enough.Professional_Reviews

There are a lot of readers who do rely on the opinions of “experts” or critics in order to deem a book worthy of their time and attention. So when these professionals mess up the details or mistake actions of the characters or the plot of the book they are reviewing, you have to wonder, did they make a mistake, or did they just not care enough to be thorough? Because, to my way of thinking, if you are getting paid for a review, you should probably be paying better attention to the text.

Now, I do understand that there are some reviewers who are doing this in addition to other jobs, and sometimes people make mistakes. Life happens. And there is the question of how often the public actually reads professional reviews from sources like Publisher’s Weekly, or Kirkus, which are more industry specific. But often, these are the reviews that librarians and booksellers use in order to decide whether or not to add a book to their collection. So when the reviewer gets things wrong, it could be affecting other people’s work. And when magazines and newspapers print incorrect information the damage can be more immediate and widespread. I think it might also be helpful for them to think about or remember why they are reviewing the book in the first place.

What About Blogs?

And then there’s the land of blogging, where I do extensive travelling, myself. What I enjoy about bloggers reviews, which is often not found in editorial reviews, is the level of enjoyment these readers are getting out of their reading, and there is a level of honesty that I think often gets covered up in professional reviewing situations. They don’t need to be polite. There’s no need to see blogger reviews as anything other than one person’s opinion. If you agree with them, great, if not, no big deal, or harm done, and you just move on to the next source of information. If they get something wrong, it seems easier to forgive their mistakes. There’s an understanding that the people reviewing on blogs aren’t bogged down by what their editors, publishers, and endorsers might want them to say. There’s a greater level of freedom inherent in this type of reviewing. I find it to be a breath of fresh air.

A Final Thought or Two

Now, from everything I’ve said, I sound pretty down on professional reviewing. Probably more than I meant to. But in fact, I know a lot of people who review professionally who I think are pretty great at what they do, and I know they care about what they read. It’s hard to think of them as making the blunders we read about in ABC News’s article. And on the whole, I don’t think every reviewer is making these mistakes. I’m sure it’s a small batch of bad seeds in a larger crop. As a librarian, and I’m sure this goes for booksellers and perhaps even teachers too, it’s impossible to read every single book that’s published ourselves. We have to rely on the accuracy and honesty of reviewers to tell us what’s good, what’s bad, and what falls somewhere in between. No matter where they are reviewing from, these men and women see a lot of books crossing their desks. Just because an occasional wire gets crossed doesn’t mean the whole profession should be discounted. I think the most important thing to remember after reading an article like this is that no one is infallible, and we should be taking every review, regardless of where it comes from, with a grain of salt.

Librarianship, Libraries, Library Programs, Library Services, Media Mondays, Music

Media Mondays: Get “Happy” with the DC Public Library

Media Mondays

Welcome to Media Mondays! This meme is dedicated to all things media related: Music, Movies, TV, and possibly other electronics and gadgetry. Here’s how it works (you’re going to love how simple it is)… Just pick a topic that is related to one of these major media formats and discuss!

DCPL Gets “Happy” (by DC Public Library)

schoollibraryjournal: “Happy,” library style. @Pharrell

This video, brought to you by School Library Journal’s Tumblr page and YouTube, is the subject of my Media Mondays post because I think it highlights many of the things I think libraries should be doing these days. I love how much the people are enjoying themselves, and embracing Pop Culture as a part of the library’s atmosphere. This is the kind of thing that will bring in new patrons. People can see that the library is a place to have fun at, to celebrate not only books, but also our larger American life. I think more libraries should experiment with videos and using various media as a means to engage their public and, hopefully, inform them about the programs and services offered at the library. You could record videos of book reviews and post them (or any kind of reviews really), or show children’s programs or demonstrate how to do fingerplays and kid songs. You could even use videos as a means of explaining how certain services work, like a new book drop or the summer reading program. So many libraries are already doing it, but if your library hasn’t branched out yet, it’s time to get creative!
Librarianship, Society

Librarians in Pop Culture

libraryjournal:

ex-tabulis:

Just a few of the librarians, archivists, and repositories that make an appearance in my “Librarians in pop culture” slideshow for our library’s ice cream social. Thanks, everyone, for the suggestions (they all made it in there, plus a ton more), and happy National Library Week!

Librarians rule!